The Adelaide Parklands’ future.

This was written in reaction to noticing this story in The Adelaide Review. A bit depressing that such news gets no reaction. My two cents’ worth. When the idea of the Parklands was conceived, the impact of cars/traffic was obviously not factored in. I want to compare Tiergarten in Berlin with the Parklands. The Parklands are bigger, but it is all shallow and surrounded by cars. There is no meaningful concept of being ‘In Nature’ when you are in the Parklands. Compared with this, Tiergarten is smaller, but it is less spread out and only divided by one (large) road. This means that you can be inside away from roads and traffic. You can really feel, as the original intention was, that you are In Nature. It is a highly successful way for urban folk to get the sensation, the peace, the ambience of it.

Further, Tiergarten is deliberately left mainly uncultivated rather than manicured, but it is lush. You can always sit on the ground, there is always shade nearby. The parklands suffer, as all common area does in Adelaide, as opposed to Melbourne from being dry, harsh and generally unshaded. (Do the toffs in North Adelaide have it better?). It can’t be used in the way that Tiergarten can be. Or, indeed, Melbourne parks such as Treasury Gardens.

It will be a great pity if the Adelaide Council or the SA Govt is allowed to give the parklands to cronies to build more cafes (because we don’t have enough of them) or to make them places for Events (yes, let’s have more noise and environmental degradation because? I’ve forgotten why) or to make them increasingly sports places combined with the accompanying car parks. What’s the problem. It’s a parkland right? So we’re parking on it.

But I would be strongly in favour of improving the usability of this natural asset by making it more accessible to the idea of urban residents being able to seek solace there. Not Coffee, not Events, not Sport. Solace. The expensive way is to put all the road surrounding parkland underground, which I guess isn’t going to happen. The cheap way which will only make things better, not best, is to slow down all surrounding vehicle traffic substantially. Uproar. Cars travelling more slowly than they might? Well. Yes. It can be done.

PS: I wonder if I’m the only one who feels unsafe walking through the parklands even in daylight? Didn’t feel save when I was a teenager, don’t feel safe now. More could be done in this regard to facilitate use.

green sauce for pasta

Parisis restaurant on King William St Hyde Park that makes a green vegetable sauce for pasta.

Spaghetti Verde (vegetarian option) Spaghetti tossed with peas, zucchini, broccoli, spinach, aglio, a splash of white wine and shaved parmesan.

I confess it sounded a bit too vegetarian for me but I tried it nonetheless and was pleasantly surprised. I try to make a habit now of throwing green vegetables together for sauces at home and it really seems like whatever is about will do. I didn’t have white wine, but I did have tuna. I think without a bit of a kick from either of these, or some other substitute, maybe some bacon, it would all be too bland.

Ingredients

  • shallots chopped
  • garlic finely chopped
  • a couple of chillis finely sliced
  • small tin of tuna in oil
  • ghee (or olive oil) for cooking
  • at least one medium zucchini washed and grated – a cup or so as minimum
  • some fresh peas
  • chives chopped
  • spring onion, white chopped and added to the sauce, the green chopped and reserved for serving
  • additional best olive oil for serving
  • grated parmesan

While boiling the water and cooking the spaghetti:

Method

Fry the shallots, garlic and chilli in ghee – I prefer to do the frying in ghee and add olive oil at the end when serving. Better taste. Add the tin of tuna, break up and mix in thoroughly. Then add the various vegetables and herbs.

Mix the cooked spaghetti into the sauce, serve with the spring onion greens scattered on top.

How not to sell a Brussel Sprout

I have a bag of brussel sprouts in the fridge and I’ve been wondering what to do with them. Looking around, a couple of points became immediately obvious.

The first is that whereas if you google most foods looking for recipes, you see a lot of Australian hits at the top, on the subject of sprouts we could not be more silent. That in itself I took as a grave warning.

The second is the way brussel sprouts get sold.

  • These awesome recipes can convert anyone…
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  • even the dubious will fall in love…

You don’t do that with other food groups, do you? Nobody starts the sell with the presumption that it’s going to be uphill all the way.

Basic fact is I’m scared of the darn things and I can’t see any way out.

 

 

Pasta and chickpeas

It’s the basis of many a variant in Italy and I’ve decided to add it to our staples like this:

Ingredients

  • 1 tin chickpeas drained, rinsed, peeled
  • 1-2 tblesp tomato paste
  • some shallots finely chopped
  • fresh garlic finely chopped
  • small pasta shapes
  • anchovies mashed
  • salt and pepper
  • ghee
  • water/stock

Optional additions as you please….

  • parsley
  • chives
  • spring onion
  • spinach
  • lemon
  • bacon
  • parmesan grated for serving

I started out frying shallots and garlic in ghee, adding chickpeas and then the water or stock if you prefer and lastly the tomato paste. Let all this simmer on a low heat for 20 minutes. This can sit in the fridge once it’s cool.

When you come to preparing the meal, boil the pasta but keep it underdone, drain, put back in the pot and add however much of the chickpea mixture you want as well as the mashed anchovies which will melt through. While this is reheating and the pasta is finishing its cooking chop herbs or other last minute accompaniments. Add and stir through. Serve.

For two people the first time I did this I added a small bunch of parsley, half a bunch of chives, the white of a spring onion and before serving sprinkled snipped spring onion greens on top. The second time I made the addition finely chopped spinach.

The possibilities are endless, one could add an Indian element by sprinkling garam masala on top. Fresh chillies would work well too.

It can be as soupy or stewy as you please. Part pureeing the chickpeas is an idea I have not explored yet but will obviously enhance a move from the one to the other.

This is cheap, healthy and tastes great. It is also quick and flexible – in Italy carrots and celery may be added, but I wanted something that wasn’t an echo of minestrone. You could also make in large quantity and freeze the first part of the recipe, the stock/chickpea/tomato paste combo.

 

Adelaide: food out

EATING OUT

Chianti Classico  is still my favourite breakfast place in Adelaide. Sophisticated menu, impeccable service. However, there are many great sounding places that we didn’t get to this time. Unlike other trips we stayed in our own place and sitting in one’s backyard eating breakfast under the shade of a vine has its attractions.

Ichitaro is is a world-class Japanese restaurant on King William St Hyde Park. Its lunch menu on Fridays and Saturdays is plain unbelievable value and its evening offerings are masterly in taste and presentation, whilst remaining excellent value too. Whereas we will be able to go to London for good breakfasts when we are back in Geneva, nothing will replace Ichitaro.

Mrs Q Gouger St. Good Asian fusion, nice surrounds, overly attentive waiters ( large place, we were early), generous serves, will be back.

Vietnamese Laundry We dropped in for a quick lunch the other day, tried the salads, a really nice heat to them, excellent value at $12 or so per serve.

Lucky Lupitas  We almost didn’t get here, it’s up towards the North end of O’Connell’s St and we had to walk past the enticing smells from a Greek restaurant to get there. We managed, but only just. Just a quick meal, but it was darn good – Manny said it would hold its own in California which prides itself on its Mexican. I can only compare it with the dire Mexican interpretation that New Mexico inflicts upon unsuspecting tourists. No wonder the Mexicans want to build a wall.

Katsumoto is a simple cafe in Gays Arcade, it does cheap unpretentious lunches. We can’t go past the eel and the eggplant to date.

Larry and Ladd There will be a moment in your life when you need a toasted cheese sandwich that very moment and I can only wish, even upon my enemies, that they find Larry and Ladd close to hand. Their plain toasted sandwich is practically life-saving.

Naturally we tried out some of the places close to us. In no particular order:

Sublime East Ave. Everybody should live on a short street with a cafe at the end of it!

Carnevale East Ave. Even closer than Sublime. You can get freshly ground coffee/beans to take home, as well as all the usual things onsite.

The Middle Store Winston Ave. Sort of Lebanesey, nice!

Dear Daisy  Leah Street. Cute, and like the others named above, all nice places to hang out.

Bar Fifty 8 Brand new, a couple of us grabbed coffee there on our way back from lunch at the Rice Bar and it was declared excellent. It has a good look about it and we look forward to lunch there some time.

Pickle in the Middle I just love this breakfast dish and haven’t yet managed to get past it: Breakfast greens 16 Poached egg, shredded kale, Asian greens, snow peas, whole oat kernels and lentil sprouts, toasted seeds, watermelon radish, orange. If you ask me it sounds weird at best, but honestly? It’s fantastic!!

By Blackbird Still haven’t been here – it has a dark look from the street which somehow puts me off – but a friend brought their cakes around recently and they are stunning. In the posh cake French style Manny thought they were at least as good as anything he’s had in Geneva. We are going to have to bite the bullet and go there one day.

A small intro to the next two. One of the things that makes Adelaide special is non-licensed cafes that open at night, generally specialising in dessert. The atmosphere is totally different from places that serve grog. Long may they thrive!

Eggless Cafe Famous doesn’t begin to describe this place. We had to go three times before we joined a queue small enough that we could actually get in when it opened! The first time I swear it was about minus 2 degrees, strong wind, rain, we got there a few minutes after opening time and yet the best we could do is put our name on the waiting list and try coming back in 45 minutes. Which we did not do. Instead we went to….

Spats Cafe  A blast to the past if ever there was one. Seventies written all over it. We love it and to have both this and Eggless Cafe (which is so very different from Spats) within a short walk of each other is very lucky for us. Spats isn’t quite as crowded as Eggless, but it’s close. You can book.

I can see there are many eating out experiences we’ll be leaving for our next visit, this one coming to a close soon. I pray that Adelaide doesn’t end up like Melbourne with too many cafes and not enough anything elses. For now, it has a great balance and more on that next post.