Chickpea and carrot salad

There are many recipes available for this combination. I started with this from manella on allrecipes and made a couple of changes based on my available ingredients.

Ingredients

  • 2 tblsp olive oil
  • 3 tblsp lemon juice
  • 2 cups grated carrot
  • 1 tin chickpeas, drained and rinsed. I peeled them too.
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped
  • fresh coriander leaves washed and chopped in lieu of parsley
  • 2 teasp ground dhanna jeera mix 60% coriander 40% cumin in lieu of ground cumin
  • spring onion, one white finely chopped

Method

Thoroughly whisk all ingredients except the carrot and chickpeas, which are then added. Refrigerate until 30 minutes before serving.

Fabulous and the bit that was left over was great for b/f in the morning.

Served it with potato salad and a cold green beans dish. Worked really well as a combination.

three salads

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orange and carrot soup

Another cold soup we have quite often in summer. Shopping around for ideas for carrot, I came upon Linda Peek’s recipe. Unlike the cucumber and yoghurt soup this one has some cooking involved.

Ingredients

  • 500g or so carrots, peeled and diced
  • one large onion, peeled and chopped
  • ghee (or oil/butter)
  • 3 cups or so of chicken stock (or something to make it vegetarian)
  • around 2 cups of freshly squeezed orange juice
  • salt and pepper

Method

Fry the onion  in the ghee and when soft, add the carrots and stock. Bring to boil and then simmer until the carrot is cooked. Cool, puree and add the juice. Season. Chill in the fridge.

Serve cold.

Linda Peek has been attending to her food blog for seven years and it’s well worth a visit. She’s eaten her way around the world and tells this hilarious story of finding herself in Canberra:

In 1975 I married Matthew, an Australian diplomat, resigned from the Foreign Office and moved to Australia.  We arrived in Canberra on a cold, blustery morning in early June in a Fokker Friendship.  As I walked up to the prefabricated building which served as an airport lounge in those days I couldn’t believe I was in a capital city.  From a culinary point of view Canberra was nothing to write home about either.  I will never forget one of our first meals in a restaurant where we both ordered steak.  “Wouldn’t you like to know how we’d like them cooked?” Matthew enquired.  “You can tell me if you like” replied the bored waitress, “but it won’t make any difference”.  And she was right.  Fortunately Canberra has come a long way since then.

Indeed it has.

cucumber and yoghurt soup

Cold soups in summer. Mmmmm. There are any number of variations of this online. I would generally use lemon because it’s more likely to be in my kitchen and if I had it about, I’d add fresh coriander to the herb mix.

Ingredients

  • cucumber, washed, unpeeled, cut into chunks
  • plain natural Greek yoghurt
  • parsley
  • mint
  • chives
  • salt
  • fresh chilli
  • garlic
  • finely peel the lime and very finely dice. The juice is for the soup, the peel to decorate the top.
  • ground roasted cumin
  • a little olive oil

Method

Puree all ingredients except the lime peel, cumin and olive oil. Leave in the fridge for a while, let the flavours mingle.

Mix the olive oil in, put soup in bowls, sprinkle the lime peel and cumin on top.

Next

Eat.

cucumber soup (2)

 

 

Hummus

One can enter any number of disputes as to the right way to make hummus. I haven’t made it for ages, but looked up a Malouf recipe in order to arrive at the following. Ideally you would use dried, soaked and cooked chickpeas, but at a moment’s notice, you can do this….

hummus (2)

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas, thoroughly drained and rinsed
  • 100 ml tahini
  • 1 small clove of garlic mashed with 1 teasp of salt
  • lemon juice – I used lime because it was what I had, one in all
  • water

Method

  • do skin the chickpeas, it makes all the difference
  • with a stick blender (or such like) blend to a cream, adding water because it will be too thick

That’s it. Refrigerate. Serve with a little olive oil and freshly ground pepper on top.

We’ve been eating it for breakfast on bread from the fabulous Christophe Berger with cheese, soft hard-boiled eggs and other accompaniments.

Actually, we’ve been eating it for lunch too. Today I tried adding yoghurt and it is a great variation, lighter and creamier.  I read somewhere that pureeing olives into it is another good touch, yet to be tried in our household. Also cumin.

Now, if only I had a way of charring eggplants here to make baba ganoush….

The economy of chicken pieces

I prefer chicken pieces to whole chickens as I never feel like breast is indispensable. A packed of what Americans call Maryland pieces, 4 x thigh + drumstick, lasts two of us for several meals.

This last time I’ve made

  • Chicken salad with rocket, walnuts and apple in a yoghurt based dressing (no oil).
  • Japanese soup noodles
  • A variation on each of the above

Because I boil the chicken, I have a good quality stock to do something with as well. It was the basis for the soup noodles on this occasion.

Good quality chicken in Geneva is wildly expensive, so I use bog standard from Manor. (Although in Australia I buy organic, free range.) But that aside, best quality fruit, best quality nuts, and salad greens. I think you get more for your money if you have to make these choices.

And the salad dressing will be happy with types of things in the cupboard and the fridge. This time, some yoghurt, some cumquat chutney I’d brought back from Australia, a little Worcestershire sauce, a little Japanese rice vinegar, some English mustard powder mixed into a paste, and then the main dressing added to it slowly until it was thin enough to add to the dressing without it not mixing in properly. That was about it.

Risotto with tuna and parsley

When you live in Geneva, you can’t have too many variations on Things to Do with Tuna, on account of how it’s probably going to be the main non-veg ingredient you can afford. I’m amazed at how well red wine worked in this, we are so used to ‘fish = white’. I will never be able to replicate this exactly as my red wine right now is an amalgam of various bottles people haven’t quite finished lately, including sparkling shiraz and cab sav.

Ingredients

  • Risotto rice
  • Shallot
  • Garlic
  • Olive Oil
  • Butter
  • Chicken stock
  • Parsley
  • Chilli
  • Tinned tuna
  • Red wine

Method

While the stock is brought up to a simmer: gently fry the shallot and garlic in the olive oil. Add the rice and coat well with the oil. Add red wine – for two people I made that several generous slugs – and raise heat to burn off. Break up the tuna in the pan at the same time. Pour in the juice of the tuna if there’s any left in the tin and quite a bit of the stock. Leave at a fairly vigorous simmer. Start stirring and keeping an eye on it after five minutes (maybe more, I didn’t time it). Add lots of parsley, chopped, and the chilli. When it seems like it’s about done, stir in the butter.

That’s about it. Sorry it isn’t the traditional hover over it the the entire time earnestly stirring, but I find reading a book during that period has no damning effect on the risotto and it’s more fun.

The kheema you should start with….

Kheema

I guess there are just about a gadzillion versions of kheema. This is the version of the basic staple recipe that I prefer of the various ones I’ve tried. Leave out the peas, add spinach instead, or smoky pureed eggplant (see another chapter for making this), or….

Ingredients

  • 450g minced lamb (or beef)
  • 4 tblesp ghee/oil
  • 200g onions sliced coarsely
  • 4 large cloves garlic chopped finely
  • 2” piece ginger chopped finely
  • 1 teasp ground cumin
  • 2 teasp ground coriander
  • half teasp tumeric
  • 1 teasp chilli powder
  • tin of tomatoes plus juice, chopped
  • peas
  • fresh coriander, chopped

Method

Over medium high heat, heat the ghee and then fry onions, stirring constantly until a deep brown. Turn heat very low, add ginger and garlic, fry for a minute or so before adding all the ground spices, stir for another minute or so, DON’T BURN THE SPICES!!!

Turn heat back up, add the meat and stir to brown, being vigilant to break it all up, no big lumps please.

Add the tomatoes, bring to the boil, cover and then turn down to a vigorous simmer. Cook for about 30 minutes, check now and then to make sure it isn’t drying out too quickly. At the end, it should be dry, with the oil seeping out. Add the peas a few minutes before serving and lastly, the fresh coriander. You may, for the last few minutes of cooking, turn the heat up high and stirfry to make sure it is a nice brown colour. In my opinion, if you’ve started out the right way, you won’t have to do that.

Serve with rice.

See another post for turning this into samosas.

(I’ve used Sameen Rushdie’s recipe for this post)